Scottish National Gallery

The Scottish National Gallery is located within the Princes Street Gardens. Opened in 1859 in an imposing neoclassical building, the gallery houses an excellent collection of paintings by “Old Masters,” including many that relate to Scottish history. Admission is free.

Gary Outside the Scottish National Gallery
Gary Outside the Scottish National Gallery

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Carmen de Max Moreau

One of the smaller sights we visited in Granada was the Carmen de Max Moreau, a traditional house high in the Albaicín that was the former home and studio of Belgium-born painter Max Moreau.

Carmen de Max Moreau
Carmen de Max Moreau

Moreau lived in this house for the last 30 years of his life, until his death in 1992. He left the house to the city of Granada and it was opened to the public as a free museum in 1998.

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Sketches in Spain

We both brought art supplies with us on our trip, and had ambitious plans to do lots of drawing and painting while away. But the reality of travel is always more exhausting than the ideal, and it’s often hard to find the energy. That said, I did manage to complete three small 4″ x 7″ ink and acrylic sketches of some of the places we visited.

A Santa Cruz Street, Seville, Spain
A Santa Cruz Street, Seville, Spain
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Last Days in La Macarena

Our time in Seville is dwindling. Since our last post of photos from around La Macarena neighbourhood where we are staying we’ve become even more familiar with this quieter area full of low-key cafes, bars, art spaces, independent boutiques and markets

Centro de Arte
Centro de Arte Acción Directa

There’s an art school around the corner from the apartment called Centro de Arte Acción Directa. Through the door we can see sculptures in progress and people painting on easels.

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Casa de Pilatos

Seville is a city with no shortage of luxurious Andalusian palaces to wander through. This week we visited Casa de Pilatos (“Pilate’s House”) and filled our cameras.

Main Courtyard
Main Courtyard (Patio Principal)
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The Real Alcázar

The Real Alcázar (Royal Alcazar) in Seville is a Royal Palace constructed by a succession of Moorish Kings beginning around the year 913.

Alcazar Arch

It is now a sprawling complex of beautiful buildings, gardens, fountains, and baths, and is one of the most visited sites in Seville. The royal family still uses some of the upper levels as an official residence.

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Seville Cathedral

The Seville Cathedral (formally the Catedral de Santa María de la Sede) was constructed on the site of a former mosque beginning in 1401. It took roughly 100 years to build and is considered the largest Cathedral in the world (but not the largest church — it’s complicated).

A Vast Interior
A Vast Interior

From the outside, the Cathedral has the feeling of a fortress, with solid stone walls rising on all sides. It is intimidating rather than welcoming despite the ornamentation that hints at what is inside.

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Museo de Bellas Artes

On our second evening we visited the Museo de Bellas Artes de Sevilla (Museum of Fine Arts of Seville) located inside a former convent building constructed in 1594.

Museum Entrance
Museum Entrance

Although non-EU residents are supposed to pay €1.50 to enter, a friendly guard gave us our two tickets at the entrance for free.

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Dublin First Impressions

After an overnight flight on Aer Lingus (good experience, would fly again) we arrived very early in the pre-dawn drizzle of Dublin. Since we’re just on a short layover, for minimum hassle we stayed at the shiny new Holiday Inn Express on O’Connell Street, located on the north side of the River Liffey. Free breakfasts and Wi-Fi are nice touches, and we can walk everywhere.

Hotel Room View of O'Connell Street
Hotel Room View of O’Connell Street

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Ascensor da Glória

North of the Rossio train station along the beautiful tree-lined Avenida da Liberdade there’s a small funicular that connects to the Miradouro de São Pedro de Alcântara on the hill above.

There are a number of such funiculars around Lisbon, but many are currently closed or under repair. This one was originally built in 1885 and electrified in 1914.

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